More Population Statistics

Pretty Babies

I have previously shown some population stats on this blog and I must admit they continue to fascinate me. I recently made the following charts which I have drawn from material on the U.S. Census Bureau website.

 

World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2011

Overall Population, mid-year 2011 = 6,913,281,066

As I have shown before there is a dramatic rise in population every year because births are far greater than deaths.

 

World Vital Events, 2011

Or, in much greater detail:

Time unit Births Deaths Increase
Year 132,697,074 56,260,324 76,436,750
Month 11,058,090 4,688,360 6,369,729
Day 363,554 154,138 209,416
Hour 15,148 6,422 8,726
Minute 252 107 145
Second 4.2 1.8 2.4

Here is a graph showing how quickly population is growing, note that it should hit 7 billion early next year:

Growth of the World's Population

 

Biggest Populations by Country

The five biggest countries constitute almost half of the world’s population

Population by Country

According to projections India will overtake China as the most populace country by 2025, and will be way out in front in 2050.

Or, in much greater detail:

Rank Country Population Percentage
1 China 1,336,718,015 19.34%
2 India 1,189,172,906 17.20%
3 United States 313,232,044 4.53%
4 Indonesia 245,613,043 2.94%
5 Brazil 203,429,773 2.71%
6 Pakistan 187,342,721 2.29%
7 Bangladesh 158,570,535 2.25%
8 Nigeria 155,215,573 19.34%
9 Russia 138,739,892 2.01%
10 Japan 126,475,664 1.83%

 

World Midyear Population by Age and Sex for 2011

Two interesting things to note here: one, the younger the section the higher the population (with only one or two exceptions); and two, the predominance of men over women up until the age of 50 after which it dramatically declines: it seems women were designed to last longer.

Age Male Female Ratio
0-4 322,608,024 301,697,577 106.9
5-9 311,773,325 290,422,870 107.4
10-14 307,702,689 286,704,031 107.3
15-19 307,558,951 289,065,134 106.4
20-24 308,713,058 294,487,829 104.8
25-29 283,637,343 273,675,082 103.6
30-34 258,789,067 250,171,454 103.4
35-39 249,005,893 241,917,699 102.9
40-44 237,442,661 232,020,138 102.3
45-49 212,945,843 212,611,476 100.2
50-54 173,142,135 176,332,850 98.2
55-59 153,431,521 159,478,408 96.2
60-64 120,438,982 127,566,313 94.4
65-69 86,507,300 95,110,212 91.0
70-74 67,685,523 80,063,892 84.5
75-79 45,924,970 59,194,582 77.6
80-84 26,376,582 39,385,631 67.0
85-89 10,946,182 20,533,878 53.3
90-94 3,015,403 7,238,261 41.7
95-99 588,656 1,897,868 31.0
100 + 75,243 313,717 24.0

 




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1 comment to More Population Statistics

  • Steve Bartelt

    It’s always interesting – and shocking – to look at population statistics. There is no doubt in my mind that one of the cornerstones of our ecological crisis is over-population (or, more precisely, over-shooting the ecological carrying capacity of the planet). However, it is very misleading to look only at population numbers. Per capita impact is far more important, at least in the short term. Americans, for example, on average, consume approx. 25% of all resources, yet comprise only about 4.5% of the world population. This means that the ecological “footprint” of an average American is a couple orders of magnitude greater than that of an individual living at the bottom of the economic ladder in India, China, Mexico, etc. This has to be included in any discussion of population relief (as if that will ever happen!).

    Thanks for the interesting website.

    Steve

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